Printout from Bridging the Years:

View of Brickwork on Upper Navigable Level in the Underground Canal

View of Brickwork on Upper Navigable Level in the Underground Canal

T1697. This photograph was taken during an inspection of the Underground Canal in Worsley in the 1960s. Construction started during the 1760s on the underground level, or 'Navigable Level', an extension of the Duke of Bridgewater's surface Canal. This underground canal network ran for some 46 miles into the hillside at Worsley Delph, where entrances to the canal are still visible today. The scheme was devised by John Gilbert as a way to deal with several issues at once. The underground canal allowed coal to be removed directly from the mine and its construction helped counter the problems of flooding, the water feeding the canal system. Coal was extracted from seams on four levels and was transferred to boats. The boats then left the underground canal and continued to their destinations on the 'surface' canal. This photographs illustrates the excellent condition of the brickwork down in the tunnels at the time of the inspection.
PublisherSalford City Council
ContributorMrs Elsie Mullineux
Creatorcorporatename - National Coal Board
Datecreation - Circa 1963
TypePhotographic prints - Black and White
Formatdimension.H - 203mm
dimension.W - 205mm
Identifier5052
SourceSalford City Archive / The Frank Mullineux Collection
LanguageEN
Relation
CoverageLocation.Creation Site - Underground Canal, Worsley, Salford
RightsBritish Coal Corporation